So pretty it hurts. #thenarrows #zionnps #nationalpark #zionnationalpark #muricathebeautiful #southernutah #utah #hiking #goplayoutside #gallivantingvagabond (at The Wall Street Corridor )
Hiking The Narrows. This is one of my new favorite hikes! 60% of it is spent hiking in the Virgin River, which helps when it’s hot as what. #thenarrows #zionnps #nationalpark #southernutah #utah #roadtrip #gallivantingvagabond #hiking (at The Narrows - Zion National Park)
Could have used your help taking this photo @hellaholly @trishamaec @cherriely1717 #statebordercrossingparty #iminutahbitches #utah #southernutah #roadtrip #gallivantingvagabond
S-O-L-O Trip planning is easy. Finding people to go with you…not so much. After bugging and asking people, whom I wouldn’t mind spending several hours in a car with, I received a definite yes from my cousin Cherrie. Great! Unfortunately, her work gave her all her requested days off…except for one. Finding someone to work for her was proving to be difficult. SO…fuck it. I’m still going to go. Southern Utah was calling to me and I didn’t want to wait to enjoy the opportunity that was spread before me (That’s what he said.) Anyways, it’s not like I haven’t traveled alone before…I’ve just never done it in my own country. After returning from my solo roadtrip to Southern Utah/ Northern Arizona, I’ve compiled a list of the pros and cons of traveling alone: PRO: Doing whatever you want, when you want. No comprising, just pure selfishness and indulgence. It sounds terrible, but don’t judge. It’s a freedom, unlike any other that you could only experience traveling solo. I’m sure, however, that there are plenty of people who are capable of being selfish and indulgent without having to travel alone. CON: You’re by yourself. Loneliness is palpable and some days can be difficult. You could be looking at one of the most beautiful sights you’ve ever seen in your life, like the slot canyons of Zion National Park, or eating at a Las Vegas buffet and discovering that they have all-you-can-eat bone marrow and there is no one to share the experience with. PRO: You’re by yourself. If you’re feeling lonely, make friends. (Do tour guides and casino employees count?!) If you’ve made friends and realize they’re assholes, you can just pack up and move to the next stop on your itinerary. And, if you aren’t feeling social that’s ok too. I’ve learned a lot traveling solo, like how the world works (not the whole world, but you know, some of it) and about myself. A lot of this, I learned from making mistakes and from asking a lot of questions. You will be out of your comfort zone, so it’s interesting to see what limits you’ve set for yourself and even more interesting seeing how you push yourself out of those boundaries. Self reliance and confirmation in what you value, become a major factor in your survival. CON: Traveling alone is costly, especially on roadtrips. $130 in 5 days for gas?! More travel buddies means more people to split shit with. CON: This is geared towards solo roadtripping and that is being the only driver. You can’t sit back, relax and soak in the sights, or take pictures (I did that anyway…dangerous and stupid, I know). No, you have to focus on driving and keeping your solo traveling ass alive. PRO: This is also geared towards solo roadtripping and it’s a good one: complete control of the music that plays while you drive. CON: Safety in numbers. Traveling alone, especially if you’re a woman, you have to have your wits about you. Use common sense and remain vigilant anywhere you travel. CON: There is no one to take your picture. PRO: Making use of the second bed in your room. Sometimes all that is available is a room with two beds. I’ve used the second bed as an eating bed and in another situation, my thinking bed. PRO: Sleeping and walking around in your room naked…oh is that just me?! Traveling alone is something I think everyone should do at least once in their life. Personal growth and sleeping naked…think about it.

S-O-L-O

Trip planning is easy. Finding people to go with you…not so much. After bugging and asking people, whom I wouldn’t mind spending several hours in a car with, I received a definite yes from my cousin Cherrie. Great! Unfortunately, her work gave her all her requested days off…except for one. Finding someone to work for her was proving to be difficult. SO…fuck it. I’m still going to go. Southern Utah was calling to me and I didn’t want to wait to enjoy the opportunity that was spread before me (That’s what he said.)

Anyways, it’s not like I haven’t traveled alone before…I’ve just never done it in my own country. After returning from my solo roadtrip to Southern Utah/ Northern Arizona, I’ve compiled a list of the pros and cons of traveling alone:

PRO: Doing whatever you want, when you want. No comprising, just pure selfishness and indulgence. It sounds terrible, but don’t judge. It’s a freedom, unlike any other that you could only experience traveling solo. I’m sure, however, that there are plenty of people who are capable of being selfish and indulgent without having to travel alone.

CON: You’re by yourself. Loneliness is palpable and some days can be difficult. You could be looking at one of the most beautiful sights you’ve ever seen in your life, like the slot canyons of Zion National Park, or eating at a Las Vegas buffet and discovering that they have all-you-can-eat bone marrow and there is no one to share the experience with.

PRO: You’re by yourself. If you’re feeling lonely, make friends. (Do tour guides and casino employees count?!) If you’ve made friends and realize they’re assholes, you can just pack up and move to the next stop on your itinerary. And, if you aren’t feeling social that’s ok too. I’ve learned a lot traveling solo, like how the world works (not the whole world, but you know, some of it) and about myself. A lot of this, I learned from making mistakes and from asking a lot of questions. You will be out of your comfort zone, so it’s interesting to see what limits you’ve set for yourself and even more interesting seeing how you push yourself out of those boundaries. Self reliance and confirmation in what you value, become a major factor in your survival.

CON: Traveling alone is costly, especially on roadtrips. $130 in 5 days for gas?! More travel buddies means more people to split shit with.

CON: This is geared towards solo roadtripping and that is being the only driver. You can’t sit back, relax and soak in the sights, or take pictures (I did that anyway…dangerous and stupid, I know). No, you have to focus on driving and keeping your solo traveling ass alive.

PRO: This is also geared towards solo roadtripping and it’s a good one: complete control of the music that plays while you drive.

CON: Safety in numbers. Traveling alone, especially if you’re a woman, you have to have your wits about you. Use common sense and remain vigilant anywhere you travel.

CON: There is no one to take your picture.

PRO: Making use of the second bed in your room. Sometimes all that is available is a room with two beds. I’ve used the second bed as an eating bed and in another situation, my thinking bed.

PRO: Sleeping and walking around in your room naked…oh is that just me?!

Traveling alone is something I think everyone should do at least once in their life. Personal growth and sleeping naked…think about it.

Kamayan - Doing it old school Filipino and eating with our hands #kamayan #filipinofood #filipino #foodcoma #foodart #forcedfriendsfolife #housecooling #savages #feast #gallivantingvagabond
Finally, got the vacation approval from my boss!!! I guess telling her she looks skinny everyday works. Southern Utah Roadtrip will officially commence next month! #roadtrip #gallivantingvagabond #southernutah #willbehotaswhat
Diving With Manta Rays Diving with manta rays in Kona, Hawaii, is constantly listed as one of the best dives in the world.  So duh…my friend Jeremy and I, both new to the diving world, were going to do it. After sunset, divers sit on the shallow bottom located near Keahole Point on the Big Island, holding flashlights to attract the plankton that the mantas feed on.  On the surface, snorkelers hold on to a buoy of some sort, lit with glow sticks.  The whole scene is reminiscent of a rave, minus the electronic dance music.  We didn’t have to wait long until the first manta ray glided through, bird-like, flying underwater.   I had to do a great deal of multi-tasking: holding my flashlight in one hand, filming with a GoPro in the other, and trying to keep a huge ass rock in my lap that my divemaster placed there so that I wouldn’t be knocked over by the swells. Nine manta rays ventured through the “arena” that night.  Afterwards, our divemaster led us on a night dive. Wanting to completely enjoy the moment, without the burden of filming, I decided to turn the GoPro off. Of course that’s when one of the best moments of my Hawaiian vacation, and my life, would happen. Ominously appearing from the black abyss, a lone manta swims towards me.  Inches away, the manta swoops and barrels, mouth agape, feeding on the invisible plankton that surrounded me.  All the while I am screaming underwater. First off, I was pretty confused.  Why was this manta ray all up in my grill? And where was its freaking tail?!  I guess if I’m going to go, this would be a damn good way to.  Death by manta…that’s how the greats usually go.   After a short time though, I couldn’t care less about that tail.  This was freaking awesome. For a few minutes the manta and I perform, what I imagined to be, a graceful underwater ballet (keyword is imagined) - the manta coming at me like it knew me, and me swimming around crazily trying to avoid colliding with it. It was so close that its junk was literally in my face.  I’m no manta ray expert, but I’m pretty sure this one was a dude. One of the manta researchers, who photographs and observes the mantas on a nightly basis, would later explain on the boat ride back to shore that mantas have electro reception. Just like sharks, they have specialized nerve cells in their skin that give them the ability to sense the electrical fields of other living things. So, in other words, the manta knew what it was doing and it shouldn’t have touched me. And FYI, manta ray tails do not contain venomous stingers, like stingrays do (knowledge is power!).  Before we parted ways, the manta ray makes one final swoop, its fin hitting my shoulder.  I guess the manta and I aren’t the greatest of ballerinas after all.  

Diving With Manta Rays

Diving with manta rays in Kona, Hawaii, is constantly listed as one of the best dives in the world.  So duh…my friend Jeremy and I, both new to the diving world, were going to do it.

After sunset, divers sit on the shallow bottom located near Keahole Point on the Big Island, holding flashlights to attract the plankton that the mantas feed on.  On the surface, snorkelers hold on to a buoy of some sort, lit with glow sticks.  The whole scene is reminiscent of a rave, minus the electronic dance music. 

image

We didn’t have to wait long until the first manta ray glided through, bird-like, flying underwater.  

image

I had to do a great deal of multi-tasking: holding my flashlight in one hand, filming with a GoPro in the other, and trying to keep a huge ass rock in my lap that my divemaster placed there so that I wouldn’t be knocked over by the swells.

image

Nine manta rays ventured through the “arena” that night.  Afterwards, our divemaster led us on a night dive. Wanting to completely enjoy the moment, without the burden of filming, I decided to turn the GoPro off.

image

Of course that’s when one of the best moments of my Hawaiian vacation, and my life, would happen.

Ominously appearing from the black abyss, a lone manta swims towards me.  Inches away, the manta swoops and barrels, mouth agape, feeding on the invisible plankton that surrounded me.  All the while I am screaming underwater. First off, I was pretty confused.  Why was this manta ray all up in my grill? And where was its freaking tail?!  I guess if I’m going to go, this would be a damn good way to.  Death by manta…that’s how the greats usually go.  

After a short time though, I couldn’t care less about that tail.  This was freaking awesome.

For a few minutes the manta and I perform, what I imagined to be, a graceful underwater ballet (keyword is imagined) - the manta coming at me like it knew me, and me swimming around crazily trying to avoid colliding with it. It was so close that its junk was literally in my face.  I’m no manta ray expert, but I’m pretty sure this one was a dude.

One of the manta researchers, who photographs and observes the mantas on a nightly basis, would later explain on the boat ride back to shore that mantas have electro reception. Just like sharks, they have specialized nerve cells in their skin that give them the ability to sense the electrical fields of other living things. So, in other words, the manta knew what it was doing and it shouldn’t have touched me. And FYI, manta ray tails do not contain venomous stingers, like stingrays do (knowledge is power!). 

Before we parted ways, the manta ray makes one final swoop, its fin hitting my shoulder.  I guess the manta and I aren’t the greatest of ballerinas after all.  

image